Sunday, March 3, 2019

Post-Bop and Avant-Garde Jazz Saxophonist Keith Gamble: Greater Detroit Jazz Society

Post-Bop and Avant-Garde Jazz Saxophonist Keith Gamble: Greater Detroit Jazz Society:      If you are a jazz fan looking for others who share your passion for jazz, then I have a group for you - Greater Detroit Jazz Society. G...

Greater Detroit Jazz Society

     If you are a jazz fan looking for others who share your passion for jazz, then I have a group for you - Greater Detroit Jazz Society. Greater Detroit Jazz Society is dedicated to promoting classic jazz, big band, Dixieland and Swing.

     Greater Detroit Jazz Society features concerts and performances in Metropolitan Detroit, such as Jazz at Shield`s now in its 20th year. You can enjoy pizza while listening to some of Detroit areas finest jazz artist on the first and third Saturday monthly. Go on-line to www.greaterdetroitjazzsociety.com to see a list of artist performing at Jazz at Shield`s.

     Like barbecue? if so, be sure to check-out Greater Detroit Jazz Society`s Rec Bowl Summer Jazz Series - Jazzin With Some Barbecue. This event is an annual GDJS jazz picnic and potluck held in August, so mark your calendar. Note - this event is for GDJS members and musicians, so I strongly urge you to become a member of Greater Detroit Jazz Society so you can enjoy jazz picnic and potluck at the Rec` Bowl, in Mt. Clemens, MI. The Rec` is a covered outdoor venue that includes a bandstand, sound system, barbecue area, and dance floor. The Rec` Bowl is located at 40 Crocker Blvd., Mt. Clemens, MI 48043.

     Another event promoted by GDJS in spring and fall is Terrace Inn Jazz Weekends, in Petoskey, MI. Greater Detroit Jazz Society sponsors two weekends of jazz at historic Terrace Inn in Bay View (Petoskey). A weekend package includes all meals and concerts. Terrace Inn is located at 1549 Glendale Ave, Petoskey, MI 49770. Spring jazz weekend, May 10-12, 2019, featuring David Tatrow and Friends with vocalist Barbara Ware. Fall jazz weekend, is October 25-27, 2019, featuring Roy Heitger`s Cakewalkin` Jazz Band, and Dave Bennett Quartet.

     GDJS sponsors Michigan Jazz Festival that occurs every third Sunday of July, in Livonia, MI. This festival takes place on campus at Schoolcraft College. This is a free festival that runs from 12 Noon to 9:00 pm, on Sunday, July 21, 2019.

     GDJS also promotes jazz education. GDJS has teamed-up with pianist Scott Gwinnell to develop Metro - Detroit Jazz Workshop now in its 9th year. Scott Gwinnell`s Jazz Workshop is located at Michigan State University Detroit Building. Information on Scott Gwinnell`s Jazz Workshop can be found at www.helpwithjazz.com.

     Mardi Gras Party and New Years Eve events for jazz fans is also offered by GDJS. For more information on GDJS events you can receive a bi-monthly newsletter by joining GDJS. Contact Sally Bolle at (248)909-8668, or by email at sally@greaterdetroitjazzsociety.com. You can also contact Membership Director Nancy Blake at (586)610-9871, or by email at lilmagill12@comcast.net

Sunday, December 23, 2018

Post-Bop and Avant-Garde Jazz Saxophonist Keith Gamble: Learning To Play Saxophone

Post-Bop and Avant-Garde Jazz Saxophonist Keith Gamble: Learning To Play Saxophone:      We are now in the Christmas season, and that means Christmas programs and performances. Your child or grandchild probably started playi...

Learning To Play Saxophone

     We are now in the Christmas season, and that means Christmas programs and performances. Your child or grandchild probably started playing saxophone during the beginning of the school year in September, and by Christmas program you expect your child to be able to play something like "Jingle Bells".

     At first glance learning to play any musical instrument can seem intimidating. Saxophone is know different with all those keys and rods. Once you get beyond your initial shock of looking at all those keys and rods, learning to play saxophone can be fun and exciting. Saxophone is actually quite easy, but the awkwardness of saxophone makes it difficult for younger students to play. It is recommended that students begin saxophone at age 10 or 11. Saxophone is not difficult to begin playing, but it can be a challenge to master. Its fingering system is not as difficult to learn as it is on other woodwind instruments, however, it does take a great deal of time to develop a quality tone.

     Parents, do not choose a saxophone based on a cheaper value brand. If cost is a major factor purchase a trusted brand name that is used, which is better than purchasing a cheap quality instrument brand new. Talk to a music teacher who can recommend a saxophone that is best for your child. Your instrument should have inside your saxophone case: 1) the body, 2) goose neck, 3) mouthpiece, 4) saxophone reeds, 5) neck strap, and 6) ligature to secure your reed onto your mouthpiece.

     Playing saxophone can be a great creative outlet for one`s talents and emotions. Merry Christmas, and enjoy your child`s rendition of "Jingle Bells" played on saxophone.

Friday, September 28, 2018

Practicing

     How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice! Practice is required for anyone who plays music. No doubt practicing music daily can be monotonous, but is  necessary to achieve musical goals, dreams, and aspirations. Effective practice is deliberate, reflective, and exploratory. There are no tricks to practicing, but there are techniques musicians employ for skill development. In this blog I will shed light on some issues musicians should consider for practicing.

     Create an atmosphere for practicing. You want to be comfortable practicing, but not practicing in a "Lazy Boy" rocking chair. Ideally you want a chair that is ergonomic to you and your posture. Also, you want a practice environment that is quiet, so you can think and focus.

     Musicians should work to develop fine motor skills such as fingering exercises. A quality method book recommended by a music teacher is a good start. Practice techniques should develop skills in aural awareness, visual, and processing. Using a metronome is a valuable tool, but students should not become depended upon using a metronome, but only for timing issues and concerns. Tap your foot or toe to keep time while playing music.

     There are 15 major scales, but in a 12 tone system three scales/keys are enharmonic. Learning all 15 major scales fluently will take some years of study, but no time better than the present to get started. Learn a scale. Once you have mastery over that scale make it part of your daily warm-up. Let your method book or teacher be your guide.

     As you develop skills in music your exercises and solo pieces become more complicated. Slowly work through while learning your solo. Once you are comfortable playing through your music, begin placing expressive qualities such as articulation markings, dynamics, and other expressive markings into your solo. Next, begin speeding-up your tempo.

     A thorough knowledge of scales and chords is essential for improvisation practice. Improvisation is a highly developed skill that requires many prerequisite studies before trying. I recommend discussing with your teacher, or partnering with a jazz musician to learn improvisation.

     Get a music teacher. A music teacher can provide you with years of knowledge and expertise in learning your instrument, and music in general. Daily practice is important, but knowing what to practice is essential. A music teacher can put you on an organized and systematic plan for learning your instrument and music.

   

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Post-Bop and Avant-Garde Jazz Saxophonist Keith Gamble: Detroit`s Music Scene and Historical Overview Befo...

Post-Bop and Avant-Garde Jazz Saxophonist Keith Gamble: Detroit`s Music Scene and Historical Overview Befo...:      Detroit`s music scene is a broad generalized description of a music community that has created so much. It is best to narrow a discussi...

Detroit`s Music Scene and Historical Overview Before Motown

     Detroit`s music scene is a broad generalized description of a music community that has created so much. It is best to narrow a discussion of Detroit`s music scene as I will do in this blog.

     During summer one can hear live music at various festivals sponsored by corporations, neighborhood and community groups, churches, and other groups sponsoring activities where music is front and center. Detroit has venues to see music and especially jazz performed. Cliff Bell`s is a jazz and cabaret club established in 1935 by a prohibition era gangster. Today you can hear jazz performed at Cliff Bell`s by some of Detroit`s finest musicians from experimental quartets to blues. Baker`s Keyboard Lounge is Detroit`s oldest jazz club. Opening its doors in 1933 as a sandwich shop, Baker`s grew into a lounge that booked local pianist. Eventually, Baker`s would hire local and international jazz musicians beyond a pianist.

     Detroit has been a major contributor to hard-bop and post-bop jazz, not because there is something in the water, but due to its history that goes back to 1898 with the publishing company of Jerome Remick & Company. Society bands from 1917 - 1922 performed ragtime, light classics, and popular songs. Society bands provided training for musicians going into big bands. Training musicians during the society band period from 1917 - 1922 led to stylistic developments for jazz from 1923 - 1929. During this period Jean Goldkette`s Victor Recording Orchestra and Mc Kinney`s Cotton Pickers were highly documented for their roles in developing big band jazz.

     Detroit`s auto industry drew thousands of blacks from Alabama, Mississippi, and other southern states to migrate north. This migration north also included musicians. Due to racial discrimination blacks could only live in certain parts of Detroit. One area was Detroit`s lower east side neighborhood called Black Bottom. Black Bottom was named for its rich and dark soil. With an increase of Black Bottom`s population Hastings Street and St. Antoine became Detroit`s cultural hub. Cultural impact on Black Bottom`s Paradise Valley ranks with Harlem and New Orleans for music. Paradise Valley`s Graystone Ballroom is referred to as Detroit`s cradle of jazz opening its doors in 1922. During its hey day of big band jazz the Graystone Ballroom hosted battle of the bands that would draw crowds of up to 7,000 people.

     Currently, you can hear jazz at Detroit`s Jazz Festival, New Center Park, Motor City Wine, Grand Circus Park, and other places throughout the city and region.